Hello again!

Apr 13th, 2017

It’s been a long time since I’ve written. I’ve been caught in a crazy vortex of mostly amazing things. Since I’ve last posted, I’ve traveled to places far and near.  I’ve installed many, many new works. And, in the process, my work has shifted in unanticipated ways. I want to write more about all of it later…but for the time being, I also want to say hello. And let you know that I’m still here. And that I hope you’ll stay tuned for future posts.

During all of this, I’ve been growing my hair out. So, to get started, here is a picture of me, with long hair, standing inside of my most recent installation: Requisite Beguilement at Rebecca Randall Bryan Gallery, Coastal Carolina University, in Conway, SC.

Cheers! It’s good to see you all again!

Liz

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Architectural Equipoise at Schmidt Artist Lofts

Jul 28th, 2014

 

Schmidt Artist Lofts

My career as an artist started in two-dimensions. I have undergraduate and graduate degrees in painting/drawing, and my early installations were basically giant wall-based paintings or drawings, with very little dimensionality involved.  Although more recent works have departed from the wall, becoming much more sculptural, an allegiance to drawing and painting is still there–through the creation of shadows on the walls, the interplay between 2D and 3D, or simply the controlled backdrop that the wall provides. Still, it’s been a while since I created a work that really utilizes the wall in an intensive way.

Schmidt Artist Lofts

A recent opportunity at Schmidt Artist Lofts got me thinking about the wall again. The lofts are housed in the former Schmidt’s Brewery building in St. Paul. The building is an architectural marvel, a sort of industrial castle. I was immediately captivated by the architecture, and wanted to reference it specifically in the installation’s forms.

Schmidt Artist Lofts

The site I was given is prominent–a large wall behind the main desk in the entry of the building, the perfect place for a dramatic statement. However, the functionality of that space also necessitates that the work not be something that someone get tangled in while attempting to walk to the offices. And the work is permanent, so needed to be durable and easy to clean.

The more I studied the space, the more I became excited about a wall-based work with some degree of dimensionality. The painting portion of the project was really important, not only creating a background color and structure, but also creating elements of pattern and texture. And let me tell you, I am fierce with a paint sprayer. Now that I own one…watch out! The spraying allowed me to create some atmospheric effects with the paint, as well as to play with a kind of poor stenciling technique that I’ve been practicing on a smaller scale for months.

Liz Miller Schmidt Artist Lofts

Liz Miller Schmidt Artist Lofts

Liz Miller Schmidt Artist Lofts

Materials also shifted slightly for this work. To ensure durability against UV rays, dust, and general wear, I utilized high quality marine fabrics that actually function much like a cross between a plastic and a textile.

Liz Miller Schmidt Artist Lofts

The finished work, Architectural Equipoise, has a strong sense of symmetry and precision, along with some of the organic movement I’ve come to strive for in my work. The slight undulations in the material are what (for me) gives the finished installation a sense of energy.

Architectural Equipoise Liz Miller

In many ways, this project provided a nice lead-in to a large-scale permanent work that I’ll be installing at the Children’s Museum of Southern Minnesota late this fall. I am really excited to have the opportunities to create these permanent projects–something I’ve been wanting to do for some time!

Happy summer, and thanks for reading!

 

 

 

 

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From Denver to Duluth: How I Conquered the West and Ran a Half Marathon

Jun 25th, 2014

I spent the first month of summer in my backyard in southern Minnesota. Sounds dreamy, right? Well, maybe not quite as dreamy when I add that I was spray painting hundreds of pieces of paper! Some months earlier, I’d been invited to be part of an exhibition called Paper Work. Everything about the exhibition was enticing: The location (Denver!), the gallery (the lovely Center for Visual Art at Metropolitan State University of Denver !), and the other artists, who are amazing: (Anne Hallam ! , Jennifer Ghormley !, Bovey Lee ! , Diane Martonis !, Dawn McFadden !, Mia Pearlman !, Susan Porteous !). There was just one catch: In order to effectively participate in this exhibition, it seemed that I would have to complete an installation entirely from paper. Minor detail.

Honestly, up until recently, I’ve always kind of frowned upon the idea of using paper for my site-specific works. Sure, it’s readily available. Sure, it’s recyclable. But wouldn’t my work lose some of its tactile edge? Would it not be less sturdy, less strong, even less assertive? Having now completed my first work entirely comprised of paper, I can say that the answer to all of these things is, in some measure, yes. In order to work with paper, I had to let go of some of the qualities I’ve valued in previous projects. But I think that I was able to more than make up for the qualities lost with new, positive attributes.

Splendiferous Jungle Warfare

The work I created for the exhibition, Splendiferous Jungle Warfare, splices sources in a way that is freer and less inhibited than in previous projects. Weapon imagery still figures into this installation. But so does fashion. And home decor. And the topography of the jungle. My work has always been fiction, based in part on fact. But in this work, I was a little freer with the fiction…and the spray paint! No longer limited to a set palette of craft felt, I found myself interested in pattern combinations that would prove both beautiful and edgy. I created intense symmetry…and then challenged the symmetry in subtle ways. I created harmonious color…and then threw a wrench in it with several color combos that are gag-worthy close-up.

Splendiferous Jungle Warfare

Splendiferous Jungle Warfare

My favorite thing about this work is that I can’t explain it entirely. It is ahead of me. I think, as artists, we are always trying to control the outcome. But often, the best outcome is when the work leads you somewhere new. It’s as though all the things I do and see and absorb that have seemed meaningless finally found a place in this new work. I couldn’t be happier about it.

Splendiferous Jungle Warfare

Splendiferous Jungle Warfare

This Denver experience, like my previous one, was awesome. I haven’t been to Denver since 2012, when I had a solo exhibition at David B. Smith Gallery. The Paper Work exhibition features some smaller works on paper from my earlier David B. Smith exhibition. It felt like a wonderful way to connect the exhibitions, and also a way to mark the change that has occurred in my work from then until now. Some things, though, never change. It took me ten seconds to find my way back to Rockmount Ranch Wear, where I had purchased celeste green boots in 2012. This time, I bought some beautiful red boots. Say…isn’t it time for me to return to Denver already?! It seems that Denver has been very good to me :)

Rockmount Ranch Wear

Cowboy Boots

My project would not have been possible without the incredible staff at CVA-Metropolitan State University of Denver. A very special thank you to Curator and Creative Director Cecily Cullen and Gallery Manager Stacy Sturdy, along with the many other employees, interns, and volunteers that assisted me during my stay. Likewise, a huge thank you to David B. Smith and David B. Smith Gallery, who lent work for the exhibition, and who first introduced my work to the Denver community. And last but not least, a shout out to my Minnesota friend Sarah Rapp, who volunteered her time to help me iron paper during her Colorado vacation.

Flying home from Denver was bittersweet. I was ready to sleep for a week. But…wait for it: I had more work to do: The next morning my husband and I ran the Garry Bjorklund Half Marathon in Duluth, MN. In my younger days, I was reasonably speedy. This time around, I was just thrilled to finish. But let it be known: Our time was over a minute faster than the average! I’ve had several people comment recently that athletics and art don’t mix. I think the contrary is true. Anyone who has done large-scale, site-specific installations will have no trouble understanding how it’s not that different from running a marathon!

Garry Bjorklund Half Marathon

Next up: A big permanent project at Schmidt Artist Lofts in St. Paul. To be installed by July 14th! When I’m not sleeping, I’ll be in the studio! Thanks for reading everyone. Happy summer!

 

 

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